M24 Sagittarius star cloud and surroundings

M24 Sagittarius star cloud and surroundings

Since there were many nights with high cirrus clouds when I was on my astrotrip to Kiripotib, I deviated from my prepared plan and chose some star clusters to photograph. By the way, it was amazing and remarkable how good the nights still were even with that haze in the sky. Since there is no light pollution, you can’t really see the thin haze other than the ‘feeling’ it was less transparant as it could…

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Barnard’s galaxy through Galactic Cirrus clouds

Barnard’s galaxy through Galactic Cirrus clouds

Barnard’s galaxy, NGC 6822, is a barred irregular galaxy in the constellation Sagittarius. It is part of the Local Group and is situated at a distance of approximately 1.6 million light-years away. In many pictures it seems quite a dull galaxy, but it has some remarkable star formation areas which seem to be almost perfect circles. Galactic Cirrus As you can see Barnard’s galaxy seems to be embedded in dust. This so called ‘galactic cirrus’…

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Widefield of Cat’s Paw and Lobster nebula

Widefield of Cat’s Paw and Lobster nebula

This beautiful wide field of view of Scorpion’s tail contains the famous cat’s paw and lobster nebula’s along with the ‘prawn’ nebula at the bottom. Near the Prawn nebula you see the ‘northern jewel box’ star cluster, or NGC 6231. I especially love the way the dust clouds on the right side of the image almost seem to be slowly moving as if they are colorations within a liquid. Image acquisition details Date: July 12,…

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The Pipe Nebula with the Sagittarius triplet; Lagoon, Trifid and IC1274

The Pipe Nebula with the Sagittarius triplet; Lagoon, Trifid and IC1274

The Pipe nebula, also known as Barnard 59, 65–67, and 78, is a huge dark cloud in the constellation of Ophiuchus, near the center part of the Milky Way. This area contains a lot of dark clouds and you can also see the much smaller Snake Nebula to the right of the Pipe nebula.  You can see the Pipe nebula really ‘popping out’ of the Milky Way when you watch it with the naked eye…

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Centaurus A with Nikon D7000

Centaurus A with Nikon D7000

As the 5th brightest galaxy in our skies, Centaurus A (NGC 5128) is a very popular target both visually as for astrophotography. The galaxy looks like a lenticular or elliptical (yes, there still seems to be debate about this) galaxy with a very distinct disturbed dust lane across. It’s a clear example of a ‘disturbed’ galaxy, one that is the result of two smaller galaxies merging in the past. When processing the image I noticed…

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The Small Magellanic Cloud and Tuc 47

The Small Magellanic Cloud and Tuc 47

The Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) is a dwarf galaxy near the Milky Way at a distance of around 200,000 light-years. Together with the LMC it can be clearly seen with the naked eye. The SMC is visually accompanied by 2 globular clusters. The biggest one is called Tuc47 and it is located 16,700 light years from us. It is in fact the second brightest globular cluster in the sky (after Omega Centauri). Unfortunately I only…

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